News/Reviews

In April, NUI Central hosted Dennis Mortensen, the CEO of x.ai and creator of New York’s most famous AI, Amy. Opening with a lengthy discussion of how we’ve gone from software to the cloud to apps, Mortensen argued that Amy is the next evolution: invisibility.   “Gartner called it...invisible software...that’s the space that we’re in,” said Mortensen. “A space for where Amy in concept doesn’t exist as a plugin, or as an extension, or as a web service, or as a website, or as an app. Amy only exists in dialogue...with this one capability: that she can set up meetings.”   Amy, the name of x.ai’s...
You go to a large grocery store to buy some Fuji apples. The signs tell you which are organic and which aren’t, but that (and the price per weight) is about all the information you’ll get. Now imagine a shopping scenario where you could learn much more about those apples: the orchard where they were grown, what chemicals they were treated with, how long ago they were picked, where they were warehoused, and more. And imagine you could learn all this just by pointing your finger at the fruit. Visitors to the Future Food District at Milan Expo 2015 needn’t imagine such a shopping trip—they...
Throughout my previous article, I demonstrated how you can access the 2D positions of the eyes, nose, and mouth, using Microsoft’s Kinect Face API. The Face API provides us with some basic, yet impressive, functionality: we can detect the X and Y coordinates of 4 eye points and identify a few facial expressions using just a few lines of C# code. This is pretty cool for basic applications, like Augmented Reality games, but what if you need more advanced functionality from your app? Recently, we decided to extend our Kinetisense project with advanced facial capabilities. More specifically, we...
The maestro raises his right arm with an abrupt, exacting motion. Then he raises it higher and higher still, slicing the air. His left hand juts out in a fist that remains clenched. With an avalanche of notes, the piano comes to life.   This is what it looks like to conduct with Kinect.   Seattle Symphony Music Director Ludovic Morlot used these gestures earlier this month to control a set of reed horns, chimes and a grand piano equipped with a Kinect for Windows and robotic devices during the performance of “Above, Below and In Between,” by Seattle-based kinetic sculptor Trimpin...
Calibration
As highlighted during the Build 2015 Conference, Microsoft is more committed than ever to delivering innovative software, services, and devices that are changing the way people use technology and opening up new scenarios for developers. Perhaps no software reflects that commitment better than the RoomAlive Toolkit, whose release was announced Thursday, April 30, in a Build 2015 talk. The toolkit is now available for download on GitHub. The RoomAlive Toolkit enables developers to network one or more Kinect sensors to one or more projectors and, by so doing, to project interactive experiences...

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